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KEY Oklahoma City

Entertainment Districts

As you enjoy shopping, dining and sightseeing, your path will likely cross one of these 'must see' neighborhoods.

Adventure District
The Adventure District is the destination for entertainment the entire family will enjoy. Located at the crossroads of I-44 and I-35 in northeast Oklahoma City, the district features Oklahoma's most outstanding visitor attractions. The district includes eight attractions within a stones throw of one another. Attractions include Coles Garden, the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum, National Softball Hall of Fame, Oklahoma Firefighters Museum, Oklahoma City Zoo, Omniplex, Remington Park, and Tinseltown USA.

Bricktown Historic District
Just east of Downtown is Bricktown, Oklahoma City's renovated warehouse district. When the area was built back at the turn of the century, bricks made from Oklahoma's famous dark red earth were the most plentiful building material available. Today, those bricks provide the signature look to Bricktown, which has become OKC's biggest hot spot for fine restaurants, clubs, galleries and shops, including Oklahoma's first microbrewery. Tour boats chug down the Bricktown Canal, a mile-long pedestrian waterway that cuts through the heart of Bricktown, turns south at the Ballpark, past waterfalls and fountains to a beautiful park. Currently under construction are a new Bass Pro shop, Holiday Inn Suites and the Centennial Crossing, a larger-than-life sculpture depicting the Oklahoma Land Run. When complete in 2007, it will consist of 45 figures depicting land run participants on their way to stake claims in the new territory.

Oklahoma City Arts District
As the majestic Myriad Botanical Gardens and the multi-faceted Stage Center - home of several theater companies - remain major anchor attractions for the Arts District, several new venues have recently opened. The Civic Center Music Hall reopened its doors in September 2001, presenting a classic ambiance from stainless steel accents to authentic art deco chandeliers for all to admire. The state-of-the art facility showcases performances from ballet to Broadway. The Oklahoma City Museum of Art houses the largest glass sculpture by artist Dale Chihuly. Standing nearly 55 feet tall with over 2,400 pieces of glass, the sculpture shines as a beacon from the front atrium of the museum. The museum also showcases numerous other exhibits as well as an impressive
classic film library.

Paseo District
The Historic Paseo District is a part of Oklahoma City that time forgot - but the arts remembered. The gateway to this historic district is considered to be NW 30th and Shartel. The Paseo was built in 1929 as the first commercial shopping district north of downtown Oklahoma City. This little Spanish village with its stucco buildings and clay tile roofs is the home of Oklahoma City's artists' community. On this little tree lined street you will find painters, potters, photographers, writers, and actors. Within the two blocks of the Paseo you can visit a stained glass works, a pottery studio, watch a painter at work, see a performance of a children's theater group, have dinner, and shop.

Stockyards District
If you want to see a little of the real West of today, mosey on down to Stockyards City, a few minutes west of downtown. Home to the world's largest stocker/feeder livestock market, Stockyards City is the "genuine article" and a "must see." For over 80 years, Stockyards City has continually offered the kind of quality products and services which are synonymous with the heritage of the West. A 'must do' in the Stockyards is Cattlemen's Steakhouse, Oklahoma's oldest continually operating restaurant. After a great steak, take time to browse the western wear and specialty shops lining the streets, complete with jeans (Wranglers is the brand of choice), wide selection of boots, hats, dusters, spurs and belt buckles the size of hubcaps. If you can't find what you need off the shelf, there are highly skilled artisans ready to custom make whatever you need. You won't find any “My parents went to Stockyard City and all I got was this lousy T-shirt” shirts or Elvis salt and pepper shakers, but you will leave knowing what a real steak tastes like, and that real boots don't come from Bloomingdale's.

Western Avenue District
Just north of downtown, beginning at 36th street and continuing north to Wilshire, this historic area is an eclectic collection of restaurants, antique shops, home furnishing specialty stores, personal services, art galleries and retail shops. Frequently referred to by locals as "Restaurant Row", Western Avenue features almost every cuisine at trendy establishments ranging from casual to elegant. Western Avenue is an older commercial strip that still maintains some of its 1940's atmosphere with the feel and charm of a small town main street. The district also features unique shopping opportunities with hip stores, antique stores, boutiques, galleries, spas and upscale shopping. Independently owned restaurants and clubs, live music, entertainment and shopping make this area a fun place to browse.





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